AOL (America Online)

AOL (America Online)

Introduction

On April 3, 2006, America Online formally changed its name to AOL.A well-known internet service is called America Online. It is frequently shortened to AOL. The business, which was established in 1985 and is regarded as a pioneer of the early Internet, offered a wide range of services in the 1990s, such as email, instant messaging, and dial-up Internet access.There were 24 million AOL Mail users as of July 2012. By 2021, there were only 1.5 million paying users.
The service’s origins can be traced back to PlayNET, an internet service.

AOL (America Online)

In November 1985, PlayNET granted a license to Quantum Link (Q-Link), an online platform. In 1988, a brand-new IBM PC client was introduced; in 1989, it was rebranded as America Online. Established players like CompuServe and The Source were displaced by AOL as it grew to become the largest online service. There were roughly three million active AOL users by 1995.At the height of its popularity, in 2001, it made the largest merger purchase in American history when it acquired the media conglomerate Time Warner. After that, AOL quickly contracted, in part because broadband usage increased and dial-up usage decreased. In 2009, AOL was finally split off from Time Warner, and Tim Armstrong was named the new CEO. The business made investments in media brands and advertising technologies while he was in charge.
Verizon Communications purchased AOL on June 23, 2015, for a sum of $4.4 billion. Verizon declared on May 3, 2021, that it would sell Yahoo and AOL to Apollo Global Management, a private equity firm, for a sum of $5 billion.AOL was integrated into the newly formed Yahoo! Inc. on September 1, 2021.

AOL (America Online)

Goods and Services

Yahoo, the parent company of AOL, acquired the following media brands as of September 1, 2021.
Engadget Autoblog
TechCrunch Developed by Women
Over 20,000 bloggers, including politicians, celebrities, academics, and policy experts, contribute to AOL’s content on a variety of newsworthy topics.
AOL creates mobile applications for its current properties, such as Autoblog, Engadget, The Huffington Post, TechCrunch, and products, such as Pip, Vivv, and Alto, in addition to mobile-optimized web experiences.

AOL (America Online)

Promoting

AOL offers a wide range of media brands and advertising services for desktop, mobile, and television platforms worldwide. Through its in-house branded content division, Partner Studio by AOL, the company offers sponsorships and brand integration. Through its ad technology stack, ONE by AOL, it provides data and programmatic offerings.
AOL formed ONE by acquiring several companies and technologies. In 2013, AdapTV was acquired, and in 2014, Convertro, Precision Demand, and Vidible were acquired. The two components of ONE by AOL are ONE by AOL for Advertisers, which has multiple sub-platforms, and ONE by AOL for Publishers, which was formerly Vidible, AOL On Network, and Be On for Publishers.Oath, the parent company of AOL, combined BrightRoll, One by AOL, and Yahoo on September 10, 2018.

AOL (America Online)

Participation

AOL provides a variety of integrated goods and services, such as subscription packages, mobile apps, and services, as well as communication tools.
Before AIM was shut down in 2017, “billions of messages” were exchanged “daily” on it and the other chat services offered by AOL.
Dial-up Internet access: As of 2021, only a small number of users remained subscribed to AOL’s dial-up service, compared to the 2.1 million users who used it as late as 2015.
AOL Mail: The exclusive email client from AOL is called AOL Mail. It links to news headlines on AOL content sites and is fully integrated with AIM.
AOL’s in-house instant messaging program was called AOL Instant Messenger (AIM). 1997 saw its release. Due to competition from Facebook Messenger, Google Chat, Skype, and other instant messenger services, it lost market share.

AOL (America Online)

AOL Desktop

AOL Desktop is a 2007 internet suite that includes an instant messaging client, media player, and web browser.AOL OpenRide served as the foundation for version 10.X, which is an upgrade. WebKit is the foundation of the macOS version.
Compared to earlier AOL browsers and AOL Desktop versions, AOL Desktop version 10.X was unique. Its features are centered around email and web browsing. For example, using AOL as a regular browser does not require signing in. It can also be used to access email accounts that are not connected to AOL. The main buttons are “IM,” “MAIL,” and a number of links to different websites. Although users must sign in for the first two, they can still use the web page shortcuts.

AOL (America Online)

Computer Checkup by AOL is “scareware”

A class action lawsuit was filed on February 27, 2012, against AOL, Inc., a partner of Support.com, Inc. The lawsuit claimed that AOL’s Computer Checkup “scareware” and Support.com’s software would deceitfully claim to be able to detect and fix a variety of computer-related issues. Support.com also offered to conduct a free “scan,” which frequently turned up issues with users’ computers. Subsequently, the companies proposed to sell software to address those issues; allegedly, AOL charged $4.99 per month for it, while Support.com charged $29 for it. On May 30, 2013, AOL, Inc. and Support.com, Inc. reached a $8.5 million settlement.

AOL (America Online)

The PRISM program of the NSA

In June 2013, after the NSA’s massive electronic surveillance program, PRISM, was made public, a number of tech companies—including AOL—were revealed to be involved. AOL joined the PRISM program in 2011, based on program leaks.

AOL (America Online)

User profile hosting was modified, then stopped

Most AOL users used to have an online “profile” that was hosted by AOL Hometown. Users had to register on Bebo to create a new profile when AOL Hometown was discontinued. This was an abortive attempt to build a Facebook-competitive social network. Users were forced to create their profiles all over again on a new service called AOL Lifestream when the value of Bebo dropped to a pitiful fraction of the $850 million AOL paid for it.
On February 24, 2017, AOL announced that Lifestream would be shut down. Users were given a month’s notice to save any images or videos they had uploaded to Lifestream. After the shutdown, AOL stopped offering any options for user hosting

References

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