Juvenile Detention

Juvenile Detention

Introduction

A kind of jail where juveniles are housed: She was given a three-month sentence in a juvenile detention facility by the judge. Synonyms: juvenile hall; detention center.
Thousands of juveniles in the United States are detained in juvenile detention facilities on a daily basis while their cases are pending in court. In 2017, the most recent year for which federal data are available, over 15,000 juvenile offenders were detained in correctional facilities on any given night, despite a consistent decline over the previous 20 years.

JUVENILE DETENTION: WHAT IS IT?

Juvenile detention is a brief form of confinement that is typically used after a young person is arrested but before a judge determines whether or not the person is guilty. A court may only order pretrial detention if it determines that a minor is likely to commit crimes or run away while the case is being processed. After their case has been heard, a smaller percentage of young people are held in detention centers while they wait for a disposition or placement following one.
Director of the Foundation’s Juvenile Justice Strategy Group Nate Balis stated, “Juvenile detention should never be normal or routine.” “Our sys­tems must investigate every option and confine young people only in extraordinary cases, given what we know about the negative effects of detention on young people and the ongoing racial disparities that define juvenile detention in this country.”
Nevertheless, in 2017, incarceration was a factor in one out of every four delinquent cases in juvenile court.

What is the number of young individuals in juvenile detention in the United States and what is the maximum duration of a child’s incarceration?

In 2018, 195,000 juvenile offenders nationwide were housed in detention centers. Although juvenile detention stays last an average of 27 days, even a brief stay can divert a young person from their intended path.

Juvenile Detention

A JUVENILE DETENTION CENTER: WHAT IS IT?

In general, a juvenile detention center is a safe facility run by the state or local government. “In all states, secure detention space is primar­i­ly used for temporarily hold­ing juveniles while they await adju­di­ca­tion, dis­po­si­tion, or place­ment elsewhere,” states the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

WHAT IS THE NUMBER OF JUVENILE DETENTION CENSORS IN THE UNIT­ED STATES?

Throughout the United States, there are 625 facilities that identify as juvenile detention centers.

WHILE DETAINED IN JUVENILE DETENTION CENTER, WHAT DO YOUTH DO?

Every juvenile detention center has a different daily schedule, but children of school age have to go to school. Young people have the right to regularly go outside, exercise, participate in a variety of recreational activities, and practice their religion. The U.S. Constitution, federal laws, state constitutions, case law decided by the courts, and access to families, counsel, and the courts guarantee the rights of youth in detention, including the right to education, medical and mental health care, due process, and safe and humane treatment.

Juvenile Detention

What distinguishes a correctional facility from a youth detention center?

Although the terms “youth correction center” and “youth detention center” are frequently used interchangeably to refer to residential facilities, they have a distinct meaning. Until and unless they are found not guilty in court, minors detained are presumed innocent. A detention center’s main function is to provide temporary confinement while a young person’s case is being handled by a judge. Contrarily, correctional facilities are longer-term placements for young people who have been found to be delinquent and subsequently ordered by a judge to be fined as opposed to being under community supervision.
In order to complete the picture, young people could also be detained in detention centers for the following reasons:
Although their case has been decided, they have not yet received a sentence—in other words, they are awaiting disposition.

Juvenile Detention


Although they have been sentenced to an out-of-home placement, they have not yet been transferred there (i.e., are awaiting placement).
They are awaiting a court hearing because they are suspected of breaking the conditions of their community probation.

ARE THE MAJORITY OF THE YOUTH ENTOMED IN JUVENILE DETENTION FRONT OF VIO­LENT CRIMES?

No, most of the juveniles in detention have been accused of non-violent offenses, such as the thousands of cases of status offenses—behaviors like truancy that are criminalized for minors but not for adults. Some young people are incarcerated not for breaking the law but rather for violating probation rules.

Juvenile Detention

DOES YOUNG PEOPLE’S JUVENILE DETENTION MAKE THEM WORSE?

A stay in pre-trial juvenile detention increases a young person’s likelihood of reoffending for felonies by 33% and misdemeanors by 11%, according to peer-reviewed research supported by the Foundation. Apart from causing a gradual decline in justice system involvement, incarceration frequently results in severe and potentially detrimental outcomes like severe health problems and alienation from one’s family, community, work, and school.
The following are just a few ways that incarceration can negatively impact young people and their communities:
Out of the classroom and into detention. When a child is taken out of their community, their educational schedule is also taken out of their hands. Additionally, although education is provided by detention centers housing school-age children, it is frequently inadequate and inconsistent with the course that the children were on before refinement. Children who are detained are therefore less likely to finish high school or obtain employment.
worsening health consequences. Children’s health frequently suffers as a result of being taken from their communities and placed in the temporary detention that comes with it, in ways that are both immediately apparent and chronic.

Juvenile Detention

disproportionate punishment. Even when taking into account the seriousness of the offense and the individual’s past history, the likelihood of detention for young African American, Latino, and American Indian individuals is higher than that of their white counterparts. Despite making up only 16% of the country’s youth population, African Americans represent 44% of the country’s defined youth population and are five times more likely to be employed than their white counterparts. These differences have long-lasting, significant effects.
lifetime repercussions. Research indicates that young people who are detained in correctional facilities while decisions are being made about their cases have more negative outcomes than their counterparts who are allowed to stay at home during this period. In addition, youth who are detained have a higher likelihood than non-detained youth of experiencing additional involvement in the criminal justice system, such as future arrests.
a cost shared by the entire community. Not only does detaining children affect their lives, but it also has a significant negative impact on their entire community. The annual cost of temporally confining youth is estimated to be $1 billion. Better alternatives would come at a huge and preventable cost to the tax payers.

DO RACIAL AND ETHNIC DISCOUNTS AFFECT JUVENILE DETENTION?

Sure. In the country’s courtrooms, detention centers, juvenile prisons, and other institutional settings, young people of color are consistently overrepresented. Racial and ethnic disparities start at the point of arrest and continue all the way through the system, getting worse as responses get harsher and more restrictive.

Supplementary Materials for Juvenile Detention

Time­ly Jus­tice: Improv­ing JDAI Results Through Case Pro­cess­ing Reforms. The JDAI practice guide provides juvenile justice systems with practical measures to safely and fairly decrease the use of juvenile detention.

Juvenile Detention


Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth in the Juvenile Justice System. LGBT youth are more likely than their peers to experience physical, sexual, and emotional abuse; this is especially true in secure settings like detention. Comprehending these hazards and the indications of anti-LGBT prejudice is essential to guaranteeing that juvenile justice systems are established to promote the security and welfare of every young person.

REFERENCES

https://shorturl.at/NST37

https://shorturl.at/pHIPU

https://shorturl.at/dkMPT


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